Episode 63 - Max Dashu

SHOW NOTE: This episode was originally scheduled to air on Christmas Day of this year but has been moved up for scheduling reasons. Some of the conversation is about Christmas and its role in our culture and in our understanding of religion. Apologies for the confusion. 

Max Dashu founded the Suppressed Histories Archives in 1970 to research and document women's history from an international perspective. She built a collection of 15,000 slides and 20,000 digital images, and has created 150 slideshows on female cultural heritages across human history. (For titles and descriptions, see the online catalog.) Read some of the enthusiastic responses to these dynamic presentations here. Her work bridges the gap between academia and grassroots education. It foregrounds indigenous women passed over by standard histories and highlights female spheres of power retained even in some patriarchal societies. 

For over 40 years, Max Dashu has presented hundreds of slide talks at universities, community centers, bookstores, schools, libraries, prisons, galleries, festivals and conferences around North America and in Mexico, Germany, Ireland, Britain, Italy, Switzerland, Netherlands, Bulgaria, Australia, Belgium, and Austria. She has keynoted at conferences (Feminism in London, 2015;Women's Voices for a Change at Skidmore, 2013; Association for Women and Mythology, 2010; Pagan Studies at Claremont University, 2008, and Domestic Violence Conference at Rutgers, 2005). 

Dashu is known for her expertise on ancient female iconography in world archaeology, women shamans, witches and the witch hunts, mother-right cultures, patriarchies and the origins of domination.

OTB has committed itself to forging relationships across ideological boundaries in the years ahead. We cannot truly understand one another if so much of our actual history has been buried, destroyed, co-opted or misunderstood. We applaud the work Max is doing to help bring us a fuller picture of human history and culture from which to weave the new tapestries of our shared becoming.